Calculations Methods Policy

Calculation Methods Policy

 

Introduction

Following the publication by OFSTED of Good Practice in Primary Mathematics (2011) and Made to Measure (2012) and the release of the Early Years Foundation Stage (DfE, 2012) Golders Hill School has conducted an audit of mathematical strategies throughout the school and has developed this policy.

 

Aims

The key aims of this policy are:

  • To promote a visually rich mathematical environment in the school
  • To help children to acquire a sound knowledge of the number system in an age-appropriate manner
  • To ensure that children experience visual and practical approaches to mathematics
  • To clarify the mental calculation strategies used within Golders Hill School
  • To clarify the written algorithms taught at the school
  • To ensure that children experience cross-curricular problem-solving opportunities
  • To promote the use of mathematical language and mathematical communication

 

Progression

In the early years, children will learn about numbers, what they mean and how they are connected to concrete practical experiences. The children will learn how to use numbers as labels and how to use age-appropriate mathematical language.  They will progress through the developmental stages for mathematics set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage (DfE, 2012) at a rate suited to their individual progress.  Songs, rhymes, games and equipment provide suitable experiences.

In Key Stage 1 (and Reception where appropriate) the children will:

  • Count objects and order numbers
  • Learn the number bonds to 10 off by heart
  • Gain an understanding of base 10 using practical materials
  • Mentally, add a single digit by putting the ‘higher’ number in their head, showing the ‘lower’ number on their fingers and counting on
  • Count backwards
  • Mentally, subtract a single digit by putting the ‘higher’ number in their head, showing the ‘lower’ number on their fingers and counting back as a reverse of addition
  • Recognise and write addition and subtraction algorithms in a horizontal format e.g.

6 + 3 = ___6 – 3 = ___

 

  • Balance written algorithms for addition and subtraction e.g.

6 + ___ = 99 - ___ = 6

  • Use materials to gain an understanding of tens and units
  • Partition numbers into tens and units
  • Learn off by heart the number bonds to 20
  • Count in tens forwards and backwards in round tens then from any given number
  • Mentally add two double-digit numbers by conserving the higher number and splitting (partitioning) the lower number into tens and units e.g.

27 + 15 =27 + 10 + 5 =

  • Mentally subtract using the reverse method e.g.

41 – 13 =41 – 10 – 3 =

  • Recognise and write two digit algorithms for addition and subtraction then apply the method conserve the greater, partition the lesser to be described to the children as keep the higher, split the lower.

28 + 14 =28 + 10 + 4 =

31 – 14 =31 – 10 – 4 =

  • It is acknowledged that it is good practice to introduce columnar addition and subtraction methods only once the child is fully secure with the mental and written horizontal methods.
  • Recognise grouping in tens as multiplication and division using sorting hoops and practical materials.
  • Learn the 10 x table
  • Apply the 10 x table to oral and written multiplication and division problems
  • Follow the method of practical work, memorisation and application for the times tables in the order: 10x   2x   5x   4x (for use with quartering)   3x   6x  7x   8x  9x
  • It is acknowledged that it is good practice to introduce long methods of multiplication and

division only once the child is fully secure with mental and written horizontal methods.

  • The four operations should be set into purposeful contexts such as games, problem-solving tasks, role play activities etc.
  • There is no fixed policy on the use of calculators and teachers may use them as they think fit as part of play-based activities, for checking mental calculations or for performing more complex calculations.
  • Problem-solving skills should be taught – looking for patterns – guess and check – being systematic – using logical reasoning by predicting, exploring, testing and explaining.

 

Parental input and homework

Children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 will be set maths homework.  It is important that parents and carers understand and follow the calculation methods used at school so as to avoid confusion for the children.  The progression of skills and knowledge set out above should not be used to ‘get ahead’ at home.  These methods should be introduced at school and practised and mastered at home. This sets firm foundations for the children to build upon with confidence.

 

Date:       October 2013

Signed:   A T Eglash